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Is Tap Water Safe to Drink in Las Vegas?

According to the International Standard or the EPA Standard, drinking tap water is safe in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Safe to drink?Yes

The Las Vegas Valley has been delivering water to Las Vegas that has met all standards of drinking water law for 66 years. The number of people supplying this water today is 1.5 million, while this number was initially much smaller. However, the most important is that even in times of extraordinary change, the work of this community hasn’t failed.

Is Tap Water Safe to Drink in Las Vegas

The most important source of drinking water (nearly 90%) comes from Lake Mead, about 2% of the melting snow that flows into the Colorado River, and the remaining percentage comes from sources that pump a deep groundwater aquifer beneath the Las Vegas Valley.

Water testing and treatment

After purifying the water from these sources, using powerful disinfectants such as ozone, many filtration systems are used to remove various particles from the water, and chlorine is finally added to ensure that the water reaches our faucets safely. If you are interested in the complete Water Quality Summary, visit the water quality reports page:

https://www.lvvwd.com/water-quality/reports/index.html#summaries

Minerals of the Colorado River make water in Las Vegas “hard”, and therefore a taste difference could be applied. Although the water in Las Vegas is hard, it doesn’t pose any risk to your health, as the water quality is following all water quality standards.

How to improve the taste of water?

No additional water purification or water hardening systems are needed, but if the taste doesn’t suit you and you want to adjust it, cool the water in the fridge and add a slice of lemon or orange. You can also try a filter with the activated carbon filter. Although these filters can improve the taste of water, it won’t eliminate water hardness, minerals, sodium, or fluoride.

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